CERN Accelerating science

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Title Industrial Application of Accelerators
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Author(s) Edgecock, Rob (speaker) (STFC - Rutherford Appleton Lab. (GB))
Corporate author(s) CERN. Geneva
Imprint 2017-02-09. - Streaming video.
Series (Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme ; 2016-2017)
Lecture note on 2017-02-09T11:00:00
Subject category Academic Training Lecture Regular Programme
Abstract At CERN, we are very familiar with large, high energy particle accelerators. However, in the world outside CERN, there are more than 35000 accelerators which are used for applications ranging from treating cancer, through making better electronics to removing harmful micro-organisms from food and water. These are responsible for around $0.5T of commerce each year. Almost all are less than 20 MeV and most use accelerator types that are somewhat different from what is at CERN. These lectures will describe some of the most common applications, some of the newer applications in development and the accelerator technology used for them. It will also show examples of where technology developed for particle physics is now being studied for these applications. Rob Edgecock is a Professor of Accelerator Science, with a particular interest in the medical applications of accelerators. He works jointly for the STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory and the International Institute for Accelerator Applications at the University of Huddersfield. He has been the coordinator of the Accelerator Applications Network of the EuCARD2 FP7 project since 2013 and will continue this role in the ARIES H2020 project. In EuCARD2, he has initiated a project to document the importance of accelerators for European policy-makers. He also leads the design of FFAG accelerators for medical applications and is making a significant contribution to the RF system of the European Spallation Source in Lund.
Copyright/License © 2017-2020 CERN
Submitted by maureen.prola-tessaur@cern.ch

 


 Record created 2017-02-10, last modified 2017-03-17


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